C4DI's Mike Clarke sends message from Antarctic Expedition!

Mike Clarke is usually part of the innovation team at C4DI, however he's currently at his 'second job' around 10,000 miles away working for the British Antarctic Survey at the Halley VI Research Station!

The Halley Research Station is an international platform for global earth, atmospheric and space weather observation in a climate sensitive zone. Built on a floating ice shelf in the Weddell Sea, Halley VI is the world’s first re-locatable research facility. This award-winning and innovative research station provides scientists with state-of-the-art laboratories and living accommodation, enabling them to study pressing global problems from climate change and sea-level rise to space weather and the ozone hole – first discovered at Halley in 1985. [1]

The Halley VI Research Station, with the last sunlight for 100 days as it enters 24hr darkness in winter.

The Halley VI Research Station, with the last sunlight for 100 days as it enters 24hr darkness in winter.

Mike managed to send us (part of) a message when he got time away from working in the sub-zero conditions, or taking recreational days to visit penguin colonies!

"...Hello from the Antarctic branch! Thought I’d send through a quick taste of life down here… we went out on a recreational trip yesterday to see the local emperor penguin colony. It was a long run from Halley out to the coast on the sled"

Unfortunately that's all of the message that we received, (hopefully not due to a killer penguin attack) but we wish Mike all the best and congratulations on the great work he's been doing for the BAS.

Mike sends his regards from his recreational trip to meet his new colleagues!

Mike sends his regards from his recreational trip to meet his new colleagues!

Mike also sent us a snap of the Douglas DC-3 aircraft used to transport people and supplies to and from the harsh conditions in the Antarctic. The DC-3 is used for these journeys since it is a rugged, reliable aircraft that can cope with landing on many tough terrains, including using skis for landing on snow and ice sheets.

The Douglas DC-3 aircraft used to transport people to the Antarctic.

The Douglas DC-3 aircraft used to transport people to the Antarctic.

Stay tuned to hear more about Mike's Antarctic Adventures over the coming months as we keep in touch with him to see what awesome things he's getting involved in!

To find out more about the British Antarctic Survey you can visit their website: https://www.bas.ac.uk/polar-operations/sites-and-facilities/facility/halley/#about

Sources:

[1] - https://www.bas.ac.uk/polar-operations/sites-and-facilities/facility/halley/#about